Sprints

Sprints are beginner friendly events where you can work on your own projects or engage in a friendly competition involving solving Project Euler (http://projecteuler.net) problems for points. Project Euler is a series of increasingly difficult computational math problems that must be solved with code (generally speaking - we've had some impressive solutions in pen and paper as well as on an Excel spreadsheet).

Each problem is harder than the last, so each problem is worth its problem number in points. Problem #1 is easy, so it's worth 1 point, while problem #50 is much harder, but it is worth 50 points. You can form teams of 4 people and solutions can be in any language as long as the code is written at the event.

Rules

  1. Problems come from Project Euler
  2. Solutions are worth their problem number in points.
  3. Source code for solutions must be written at the event. Mathematics libraries with methods for prime, factorial, fibonacci numbers, or other methods that make solving a particular problem trivial are not allowed. Those methods must be implemented by the team during the hack night.
  4. Programmatic solutions may be written in any language.
  5. Problems may be done in any order.
  6. You may practice ahead of time.
  7. Once a solution has been reached and verified on projecteuler.net, it must be checked in* with an event organizer to count toward a team's point total.
  8. Teams may consist of up to four people.
  9. Participants are given 30 minutes at the beginning to meet, eat if any food has been provided, and form teams. They are then given 90 minutes to solve as many problems as they can.

* Check ins involve showing the code, running it to produce a solution, and showing that the solution is correct on the Project Euler site. This means there needs to be at least one person per team who has a Project Euler account (sign up here).

Core Values

The Project Euler Sprint is a beginner-friendly community of mathematically oriented coders (and vice versa) who come together to solve computational mathematics problems from Project Euler in the form of a competitive game. But more than just a competition, the Project Euler Sprint is about community, learning, and inclusivity. We do not discriminate. Anyone with any level of experience in math or programming is encouraged to participate, including those with no experience.

Our core values are as follows:

Community

The Project Euler Sprint is first and foremost about fostering a community of learners, experimenters, and enthusiasts of both programming and mathematics.

Inclusivity

The Project Euler Sprint is a place for people of all experience levels to come together. But beside experience, we welcome people regardless of gender, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, age or religion*.

Fun

Finally, The Project Euler Sprint is about having fun while solving problems, meeting new friends, and learning new things. If it's not fun, it's not worth doing.

Code of Conduct

The Project Euler Sprint is dedicated to providing a harassment-free experience for everyone, regardless of gender, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, age or religion. We do not tolerate harassment of attendees in any form. Sexual language and imagery is not appropriate for any Project Euler Sprint venue. Attendees violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled from the event without a refund at the discretion of the organizers.

Read more here.

Credits

The Project Euler Sprint was inspired by and takes its name from Project Euler:

Project Euler is a series of challenging mathematical/computer programming problems that will require more than just mathematical insights to solve.

The Project Euler Sprint is merely rules for a game played with problems on the Project Euler site.

Check out more at projecteuler.net!